Myths and realities about technology in

Teacher's Corner Myths and Realities About Technology in K12 Schools Technology is utilized by almost every business and school in the United States, including elementary and secondary schools. Technology is now being utilized in more ways to enhance and make education more accessible worldwide.

Myths and realities about technology in

Myths and Realities about Technology in K Schools Only a clear-eyed commitment to using technology to help meet central educational goals will enable us to get a substantial return on our investment By Glenn M.

Myths and realities about technology in

How Technology is Changing the Way We Teach and Learn,' a book-length special report from the Harvard Education Letter featuring articles and essays on topics such as professional development, distance learning, the digital divide, special needs, using technology to teach science, math, reading and writing, and much more.

To order call or e-mail orders edletter. Putting computers into schools will directly improve learning; more computers will result in greater improvement. There are agreed-upon goals and "best practices" that define how computers should be used in K classrooms.

Once teachers learn the basics of using a computer they are ready to put the technology to effective use. The typical district technology plan is sufficient for putting technology to effective use Myth 5: Equity can be achieved by ensuring that schools in poor communities have the same student-to-computer ratios as schools in wealthier communities.

But will we receive an adequate "return on investment" to the educational bottom line? That is, will all this technology improve education for large numbers of students? Will it make our educational systems more effective and efficient? Will it help schools better prepare students for their lives in the 21st century?

Myths and Realities about Technology in K Schools: Five Years Later – CITE Journal

As we begin this new century, the investment in technology for schools resembles the investments being made in many "dot-com" Internet companies.

In both cases, the investments are based on the potential of new technologies, in the hope that this potential will be fulfilled in the coming years. And in both cases the investments involve significant risks and may be a long way from yielding adequate returns. Maximizing our investment in technology requires a clear vision of our goals and well-developed plans for achieving them.

Unfortunately, the rapid influx of technology into schools is, in many cases, running ahead of the educational vision and careful planning necessary to put technology to good use. In fact, what is being done is often based on misconceptions or myths about what is required to gain substantial educational returns.

Putting computers into schools will directly improve learning; more computers will result in greater improvements. Computers are powerful and flexible tools that can enhance teaching and learning in innumerable ways.

However, the value of a computer, like that of any tool, depends upon what purposes it serves and how well it is used.

Many computers in schools, even up-to-date multimedia computers with high-speed Internet access, are not being used in ways that significantly enhance teaching and learning. There are many reasons for this, including the following: While these uses are beneficial, they don't justify the size of the investment.

While much good educational software has been developed, finding and obtaining what you need to run on the computers you have, and to fit into your curriculum, remains difficult in many cases.

Thus teachers feel they cannot depend upon the technology, so they do not plan to use for important purposes in the classroom. Many schools have been placing computers in every classroom, aiming for an eventual ratio of one computer for every six students. In schools without computers in the classrooms, teachers have to move the class to a computer lab, which must be scheduled well in advance.

Since this situation makes it difficult to integrate computers into the flow of lessons, it often encourages teachers to treat computer activities as special events, rather than as central to the curriculum. Therefore, they have typically included computer activities only as optional supplements to other classwork.

The reality corresponding to Myth 1 is that all this expensive technology will yield little educational return until schools and districts address the need for professional development, technical support, the availability of appropriate software, classroom management, and curriculum integration.Kleiman, G.M.

(). Myths and realities about technology in k schools: Five years later. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 4(2), Myths and Realities About Technology. Bicol University GRADUATE SCHOOL College of Education Graduate Program ARNEL A. ADTOON Teaching with Technology M.A.

in General Science Education May 1, Myths and Realities about Technology in Schools. Myths and Realities About Technology in K12 Schools. Technology is utilized by almost every business and school in the United States, including elementary and secondary schools.

The reality corresponding to Myth #1 is that all this expensive technology will yield little educational return until schools and districts address the need for professional development, technical support, the availability of appropriate software, classroom. View References & Citations Map References.

Kleiman, G.M. (). Myths and realities about technology in K schools. In the Harvard Education Letter report, The digital classroom: How technology is changing the way we teach and iridis-photo-restoration.com: Glenn M.

Kleiman. Myths and Realities About Technology in K Schools Only a clear-eyed commitment to using technology to help meet central educational goals will enable us .

Myths and Realities about Technology in K Schools